The Acupuncturist Medical Oath

Sun Si Miao (581-682):
As a Physician of Traditional Chinese Medicine:• I shall look upon those who are in grief, as if I myself have been struck and I shall sympathize with them deep in my heart.• I will not give way to wishes and desires but develop first a marked attitude of compassion• I shall not ponder over my own fortune or misfortune and thus preserve life and have compassion for it.• Whoever suffers from disease and illness will be looked upon with contempt by people. I shall maintain an attitude of compassion, of sympathy, and of care. In no way shall arise an attitude of rejection.• I shall treat all patients alike, whether powerful or humble, rich or poor, old or young, beautiful or ugly, resentful relatives or kind friends, Chinese nationals or foreigners, fools or wise men.• I shall not emphasize my own reputation, and belittle the rest of physicians while praising my own virtue.• Neither dangerous mountain passes, nor the time of day, neither weather conditions nor hunger, thirst nor fatigue shall keep me from helping wholeheartedly.With this oath, I shall fulfill my responsibilities and my destiny as a physician to each and every patient who seeks help from me, until I am no longer capable of fulfilling my obligations, or until the end of this lifetime.

The Hot Flash: How I Treat Menopausal Transition in the Clinic

This information is interesting and valuable for both acupuncturists and for the general public.

Dr. Grosam’s free one-hour lecture on perimenopause diagnosis and treatment strategies.

 

What Every Acupuncturist Needs To Know

Before You Begin
Understanding

Understand your patient.
Understand the symptoms.
Understand the severity.
Understand the possible effectiveness of your treatments.

“50% – 20% – 20% – 10%” Rule

50%: Patients will naturally respond to acupuncture treatments with full efficacy results.
20%: Patients will respond slower and more gradual and will need acupuncture prescription modifications.
20%: Patients will need long treatment courses, herbs, and lifestyle changes.
10%: Patients will not respond to Chinese medicine.

Build Effective Treatment Protocols
“Mild – Moderate – Severe” Rule
1.) Quantity: Based on severity and duration of symptoms:

Mild Conditions: (3-6 Tx).
Moderate Conditions: (6-12 Tx).
Severe Conditions: (12-24+ Tx).
Short Duration/Acute Conditions: (3-12 Tx).
Long Duration/Chronic Conditions: (12-24+ Tx).

2.) Frequency: Based on severity and duration of symptoms:

Mild Conditions: (1 Tx/wk).
Moderate Conditions: (1-2 Tx/wk).
Severe Conditions: (2 Tx/wk).
Short Duration/Acute Conditions: (2 Tx/wk).
Long Duration/Chronic Conditions: (1 Tx/wk).

3.) Every individual person is different.

Every individual will respond uniquely to acupuncture based on your particular lifestyle, diet, exercise, work, and sleep habits.
Emotional, environmental and genetic factors will also play a role and are a necessary consideration.

Treatment Schedule
1.) Set up acupuncture protocol based on diagnosis.

2.) Give the patient a predetermined set amount of treatments based on severity.

3.) Continue treatments if there are changes in: Severity, Duration, or Frequency of symptoms.

4.) If there are no changes, modify acupuncture prescription and repeat.

5.) Once the patient’s symptoms are manageable and controlled (within quality of life parameters), start spacing out the treatments or start maintenance treatments.

6.) If there are no changes after set amount of treatments, add herbal prescriptions and suggest lifestyle modifications.
“Constant changing of acupuncture prescriptions, herbal prescriptions, and lifestyle modifications, may lead to the increased difficulty of knowing which therapy is the key to the patient’s symptom alleviation.”

Sample Protocol
1.) Regulate zang-fu organs, harmonize digestion, and calm shen. (“The Oil Change”)

2.) Regulate qi, clear/drain […]

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine Treatment for Men’s Sexual, Reproductive and Uro-Genital Health

Sun Acupuncture is dedicated in helping men with their reproductive, sexual, and uro-genital health. Whether it’s erectile dysfunction, poor sperm parameters, or urinary issues, acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine can provide excellent support for men in these areas.

American Board of Oriental Reproductive Medicine

Sun Acupuncture is pleased to announce that Dr. Brian Grosam is now a member of the American Board of Oriental Reproductive Medicine (ABORM).

The ABORM is a dedicated group of acupuncture and Chinese medical professionals from around the world bringing the latest fertility and reproductive medicine research and current treatment strategies to their patients and the public.

Please feel free to contact Dr. Brian Grosam via email at Sun Acupuncture or by telephone at 952-935-0600 to learn more.

Preparation for IVF with Acupuncture

How can Chinese medicine and acupuncture help improve your IVF chances and percentages?

1. Increase blood supply (including oxygen and nutrients) to the testicles.

2. Increase blood supply (including oxygen and nutrients) to the follicles.

3. Improve ovarian function by regulating hormone levels (LH, testosterone, insulin).

4. Reduce stress hormones associated with reduced IVF success.

5. Increase oocyte mitochondrial ATP output.

6. Enhance follicle antioxidant defenses.

7. Improve follicle environment by reducing inflammatory cytokines.

 

Courage, Direction, Expression, Bonding, Separation and Transformation

Have you wondered why is it that one person is full of life and may set out to achieve amazing goals while another person is dull and does not set out to achieve anything? I often wondered why particular people were predisposed to be a certain way. After reading “Dragon Rises, Red Bird Flies” I realized there was more underlying factors to the human character than the usual emotions covered in so many texts. It is true, that some of our make-up develops from our emotions and these emotions, being fear, anger, joy, worry and sadness, are very important in the clinic. Patients will, in fact, have one of these emotional imbalances as a chief complaint. The emotions will too, bear weight in the clinic as a classic manifestation of a particular pattern and diagnosis. However, TCM psychology is far more exhilarating to study and far more useful in the clinic when you can look beyond the emotional state of the patient. This is the ability to recognize that each individual has a defined primal disposition. This quality or makeup of the individual shapes the person’s entire life from the day they are born. Based on five-element, yin-yang, deficiency/excess and Zang-Fu theory, I will summarize these individual traits into fundamental explanations, so they can be useful in the clinic.
Kidneys “Courage”
Bronze statue of Bruce Lee on “Walk of Stars” Hong Kong, 2007
1.) Kidney Yin: Influences learning, nutrition, growth and cultural development.

Kidney yin deficiency:

Will not identify with human values or ethics, will tend to be crude or savage like, indifferent for aesthetics, make poor judgments, will have increased irritability, egocentricity, cheerlessness, paranoia and depression. They will suffer from fear but will mask it with aggressive pose. […]

How Acupuncture Improves Natural Fertility

Great video!

Fertility Treatments in 2015

Sun Acupuncture will be introducing a comprehensive fertility treatment program in 2015 to meet the increasing requests.

Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine have long and successful history in helping couples become pregnant and can be used in conjunction with other medical fertility treatments. Your pregnancy percentages will definitely improve with acupuncture and treatments are available for both partners.

Dr. Brian Grosam

Living & Studying in China

I ran across a short article I wrote for the AAAOM acupuncture college newsletter back in 2006 while we were living in China. I thought you all may enjoy this fun little read.

Me, my wife and two boys have been living in Jinan, China for six months and it is nothing like we imagined.  So far, it has been the most difficult and exhilarating experience of our lives. I think I speak for my entire family, that if we had had a “Plan B,” an opportunity to quit, move back to the states and have our old house, work and life, we would have done so in the blink of an eye.  Every day here, we have challenges, realizations, problems, or obstacles that needs full attention.  For example, there is the culture shock and the great trouble of ordering food in a restaurant without speaking the language or being able to read a menu.  There are also a great many reasons why I am happy to have had my hepatitis shots, I won’t say anymore. Another one is the day and a half traveling back and forth from different governments buildings to secure our family’s visas.  Dr. Lu asked me to share my thoughts and experiences of living in China.  I thought you would enjoy it most if I shared with you the perfect day of what it is like to live and study in China.

I wake at 5 AM every morning, tired from late-night studying and prepare for my day.  I pack my bag with books, a Chinese-English dictionary and daily necessities.  I grab my travel mug filled with green tea and hike off to the mountain by 5:30. The streets are empty […]